Dr. John Bindernagel, one of the most prolific voices for more than six decades in the study of Sasquatch has passed away after losing his battle with cancer at the age of 77.  The wildlife biologist, who was world renowned for his research into Bigfoot, was born in in 1941, residing most of his life on Vancouver Island, in Comox, British Columbia.  Dr. Bindernagel was a pioneer and critical researcher when it came to the creature, writing his first book in 1998 called, ‘North America’s Great Ape: The Sasquatch’.
His passion for cryptid research took him all over the world, recently appearing in Todd Standing’s Netflix Documentary, ‘Discovering Bigfoot’.  On his website, Bindernagel stated, “As a scientist at the PhD level, I am one of a very small minority of such credentialed scientists undertaking sasquatch research. My perspective, however, is that of one of many participants in the unfolding discovery. Long before now, the sasquatch has become considered by many of us to be a discovered mammal species, but one whose discovery remains to be acknowledged—or even considered—by relevant scientists in the larger scientific community.”
Former guest on Spaced Out Radio, Thomas Sewid called Bindernagel’s passing a big loss for the research community on his Facebook page. “It was John I was told by my father to go and seek to tell of my encounter I had seeing two Sasquatch in my commercial fishing boat spotlight back in the early 90’s. I went to see him and a true friendship was created that would last for decades. My fondest memory of our expeditions was a night we were anchored on a boat close to shore listening for something? I had to nudge John with my foot and say, “John, turn down your hearing aides, all I can hear is the squealing”. He dragged me to my 1st Sasquatch conference in Vancouver back in the late 1990’s. He told me to get on stage and share my native perspectives towards the creatures. He said don’t be afraid, they want to hear what you have to say. Now look where we are, more people want to know the native stories and perspectives towards the creatures. Oh how I shall always cherish those times at his house with him excitedly digging through his collections spouting off about how I had to see something he had. He was awesome how he got so into the moment and was a ball of jitering excitement and happy vocalizations! Yes, he was a gem and a dear friend.  He will be missed, but for now all I can say is he’s smiling down upon us all – for he now has the answers to the questions he had as our leading Canadian Sasquatch/Bigfoot researcher. Halla Kas La (Go In Peace) my friend John.”